Patent for online collaborative interface for Music Analysis ‘TONALITIES’

TONALITIES, IReMus’ pilot for musical heritage data project Polifonia, develops tools for the modal-tonal identification, exploration and classification of monophonic and polyphonic notated music from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Now, the tools are available for use within the TONALITIES Interface for music analysis. Additionally, a patent was recently acquired for this collaborative interface by the IReMus lab.

29 May 2024

TONALITIES, IReMus’ pilot for musical heritage data project Polifonia, develops tools for the modal-tonal identification, exploration and classification of monophonic and polyphonic notated music from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Now, the tools are available for use within the TONALITIES Interface for music analysis. Additionally, a patent was recently acquired for this collaborative interface by the IReMus lab.

Semantic web technologies and AI to aid in music analysis
The TONALITIES user interface includes interactive music analysis tools to support informed and guided analytical inquiry. It provides an annotation environment that allows the comparison and commentary of different analytical viewpoints when studying musical scores. The software uses semantic web technologies to produce theoretical models whose concepts can be associated manually, and eventually using artificial intelligence, with arbitrary musical selections via a highly ergonomic interface.

This interface is intended for a variety of audiences – cultural institutions; higher education, secondary education and specialist music training; professional performers; researchers and the music industry. The aim is to highlight different musical properties by comparing points of view and keeping track of the reasoning that led to the production of documented and signed musical analyses. Users can do this by first creating an ORCID ID and starting an analytical project. Other users can open the same project and work on it, and each contribution is signed, as each user is identified via their ORCID ID. A big plus is that any MEI score that is publicly available on the web can be annotated by just providing a link.

Teaching tool
Stakeholders from the educational sector, who were actively involved in the user experience design, praise the usefulness of the tool and design of the interface: “I am really impressed by the elegance of the overall interface”, says professor of music Richard Freedman, key stakeholder from Haverford College (USA) and who will use the tool during his classes in the Fall term 2024. 

The interface proves to be a valuable teaching tool – at both secondary and higher education levels – in that it enables structural elements to be designated and associated with analytical concepts). From a pedagogical point of view, it contributes to a reasoned integration of AI into training and makes it clear that the association between concepts and musical segments is never neutral but a matter of interpretation. The interface supports amateur and professional artistic training, because it establishes the link between what is seen and heard, and will eventually make it possible to annotate different recorded interpretations of music – for example on the basis of concepts derived from historically informed interpretation.

Patent
Recently the Centre national de la recherche scientifique acquired a patent on this unique and useful music analysis collaboration tool. The interface was developed as part of a Horizon 2020 funded project Polifonia. All tools and publications produced in this project are offered as open access components of a Polifonia Ecosystem. The TONALITIES user interface can also be found here and can be used and implemented freely, as long as the IReMus laboratory is credited.   

Learn more

TONALITIES interface: https://data-iremus.huma-num.fr/tonalities/
Press release:

Contact: christophe.guillotel-nothmann[@]cnrs.fr (Pilot Leader)
About IReMus: Institut de recherche en Musicologie is a CNRS laboratory that covers most of the sub-disciplines of musicology (historical and systematic musicology, ethnomusicology, the study of contemporary popular culture, musical institutions, the sociology of music, cognitive psychology, musical aesthetics, digital musicology), and is responsible for promoting the musical heritage preserved in France.

Recent News

From the beginning of the project, Podiumkunst.net and Polifonia have been in close contact and looked to each other as role models. Our stakeholder Podiumkunst.net reflects on this synergy with a positive outlook. Remco de Boer and Monique in het Veld on the importance of the collaboration and the impact. 

From the beginning of the project, Podiumkunst.net and Polifonia have been in close contact and looked…

11 June 2024

TONALITIES, IReMus’ pilot for musical heritage data project Polifonia, develops tools for the modal-tonal identification, exploration and classification of monophonic and polyphonic notated music from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Now, the tools are available for use within the TONALITIES Interface for music analysis. Additionally, a patent was recently acquired for this collaborative interface by the IReMus lab.

TONALITIES, IReMus' pilot for musical heritage data project Polifonia, develops tools for the modal-tonal…

29 May 2024

From April 8 to May 6 Polifonia organised their own version of the Eurovision Song Contest, the Polifonia Song Contest: musicians of all levels were challenged to create the ‘soundtrack of our history’ by using samples from the rich collections in the Polifonia project. Today we can announce the winning song.

From April 8 to May 6 Polifonia organised their own version of the Eurovision Song Contest, the Polifonia…

13 May 2024

After four years of development work, the Polifonia project team is excited to present the results. The consortium, consisting of 10 partners from Italy, the Netherlands, France, England and Ireland launches the music discoverability platform ‘Polifonia Web Portal’. In addition, the researchers and developers have also unlocked and linked other music data, developed tools and software that will help musicologists take steps forward in their research on European musical heritage.

After four years of development work, the Polifonia project team is excited to present the results.…

8 May 2024

The Polifonia project formally ended on April 30, which means that the tools and software developed within this 4-year-project are released and ready for use. Today we look at ‘Patterns UI’.

The Polifonia project formally ended on April 30, which means that the tools and software developed…

3 May 2024

Polifonia Song Contest is two weeks in, and will continue for another two weeks. Have you downloaded the sample pack yet?

With two weeks to go until the deadline, the "Polifonia Song Contest" beckons all musicians who find…

22 April 2024

Are you the type of musician that is inspired by old sounds, such as cheerful Irish folk melodies, the majestic resonance of pipe organ concerts, and the timeless chimes echoing from century-old Italian bell towers? Then ‘Polifonia Song Contest’ is your challenge!

Are you the type of musician that is inspired by old sounds, such as cheerful Irish folk melodies, the…

8 April 2024

The consortium is preparing for the last face-to-face consortium meeting of the Polifonia project in April 2024.

The consortium is preparing for the last face-to-face consortium meeting of the Polifonia project in…

4 April 2024

Polifonia is known for its strong links with academia and is pleased to present some highlights in its involvement in research and associated conferences.

Polifonia is known for its strong links with academia and is pleased to present some highlights in its…

29 February 2024

In 2024, Paul Mulholland, Naomi Barker and Paul Warren (The Open University, U.K) are continuing their experiment investigating how different kinds of music influence the appreciation of an artwork; and to what extent the same kind of sense-making processes are used when viewing artwork and when listening to music. To do this, the researchers are looking for more participants. They have now automated the process so that participants can complete the experiment online without the involvement of an experimenter.

Music instrument with music notes on white background illustration In 2024, Paul Mulholland, Naomi…

17 January 2024

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement N. 101004746