Explore the second version of the Polifonia Ecosystem

Last summer, the first version of the Polifonia Ecosystem was released. Now the project is ready to present an updated version with 22 datasets, 20 tools and 67 reports.

23 August 2023

Last summer, the first version of the Polifonia Ecosystem was released. Now the project is ready to present an updated version with 22 datasets, 20 tools and 67 reports. 

The Polifonia Ecosystem: a toolbox designed for musical heritage enthusiasts

The Polifonia Ecosystem, supported by the GitHub developer’s platform, holds Polifonia’s collection of components for developing intelligent applications leveraging musical cultural heritage. The ecosystem consists of data, methods and tools supporting discovery, extraction, encoding, interlinking, classification, exploration of and access to musical heritage knowledge on the Web. The components are both independent — they have some value on their own — and interlinked — they can be used together in order to satisfy specific end-user needs. The end-users, such as researchers, musicians, heritage professionals and anyone interested in musical cultural heritage, can now use an updated ecosystem to find relevant datasets, tools and services in one central spot, next to the ‘output’ section on the project website. Polifonia also places its Ecosystem in its entirety in the GitHub supported environment, to ensure the output remains publically accessible after the project ends. 

Explore the Ecosystem with the new tutorial video

Go directly to the website (https://polifonia-project.github.io/ecosystem/) and watch the latest video in our ”Tutorial Video series” in order to start exploring the second version of the Ecosystem. 

Many more of the tools uploaded to the Ecosystem will be covered in the coming week, supported by clear tutorial videos, all to help you become more familiar with Polifonia’s results.

Polifonia’s ecosystem content is managed on GitHub and users are welcome to contribute.  See the Ecosystem Rulebook on GitHub on how to participate: (https://github.com/polifonia-project/rulebook)

Recent News

Last year, the Polifonia project and new ways of engaging with our musical past were introduced to audiences of all ages during the European Night of the Researcher. This year, the Polifonia team looks forward to returning to this colorful event!

Last year, the Polifonia project and new ways of engaging with our musical past were introduced to audiences…

21 September 2023

The MEETUPS pilot  focuses on supporting music historians and teachers by providing a Web tool that enables the exploration and visualisation of encounters between people in the musical world. A new demo video gives a sneak peak into the interface.

The MEETUPS pilot  focuses on supporting music historians and teachers by providing a Web tool that…

18 September 2023

This year, Europeana’s annual conference puts all things tech in the spotlight, with EuropeanaTech 2023 – Explore, Engage, Experience: cultural heritage in the data space and beyond led by the experts, developers and researchers from the R&D sector who make up the EuropeanaTech community.

This year, Europeana’s annual conference puts all things tech in the spotlight, with EuropeanaTech…

13 September 2023

Do you want to learn more about pipe organs, but can’t wait for the ORGANS Knowledge Graph to be ready? On Nationale Orgeldag (National Organ Day), organs can be viewed, played and heard throughout the Netherlands.

Do you want to learn more about pipe organs, but can't wait for the ORGANS Knowledge Graph to be ready?…

7 September 2023

Last summer, the first version of the Polifonia Ecosystem was released. Now the project is ready to present an updated version with 22 datasets, 20 tools and 67 reports.

Last summer, the first version of the Polifonia Ecosystem was released. Now the project is ready to…

23 August 2023

by James McDermott

When writing a tune, when do composers repeat some material; when do they introduce a variation of previous material; and when do they introduce totally new material? To ask the same questions in a different way: what are the abstract syntactical structures in melodies?

by James McDermottWhen writing a tune, when do composers repeat some material; when do they introduce…

11 August 2023

How do you ensure that everyone can participate in musical activities? That’s the question the ACCESS is trying to answer and this Polifonia pilot is doing so by developing haptic devices in relation to music making. And by actively engaging users during workshops, as was the case at Milton Keynes International Festival 2023 (UK) last Sunday.

How do you ensure that everyone can participate in musical activities? That's the question the ACCESS…

28 July 2023

Polifonia is preparing for the 7th Polifonia Project Meeting. This face-to-face meeting will take place in Bologna from Oct. 16-20. 

Polifonia is preparing for the 7th Polifonia Project Meeting. This face-to-face meeting will take…

25 July 2023

Last weekend, Polifonia was part of Sonár festival Barcelona. Max Tiel from our consortium partner Netherlands Institute for Sound & Vision, gave a presentation on the insights of the Polifonia project.

Last weekend, Polifonia was part of Sonár festival Barcelona. Max Tiel from our consortium partner…

23 June 2023

Polifonia team members Nicolas Lazzari, Andrea Poltronieri and Valentina Presutti recently won the Best Research Paper Award at ESWC23.

Polifonia team members Nicolas Lazzari, Andrea Poltronieri and Valentina Presutti recently won the Best…

16 June 2023

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement N. 101004746